/edu/ - Education

Education, Literature, History, Science

catalog
Mode: Reply
Name
Subject
Message

Max message length: 8192

Files

Max file size: 80.00 MB

Max files: 5

E-mail
Password

(used to delete files and postings)

Misc

Remember to follow the rules


/math/ general Comrade 04/04/2020 (Sat) 17:37:10 No. 344
All good communists study math. What are you studying right now? What is your favorite field of mathematics and why? Personally, I really like the book "Linear Algebra Done Right" by Sheldon Axler. It is on Libgen if you are interested and I attached a pdf.
(38.24 KB 657x527 1541004218197.jpg)
>>366 Did you write that pdf anon? It looks like a work in progress
>>704 Yes! Barely started it.
>>635 Yeah I've met some people that liked it but no one in my field of interest. I have no intention to ever learn it however
>>707 I don't either. I know: BASH, C++, Python, Lisp, Mathematica, and MATlab/Octave I want to learn: R and that's really the only one Is there anything I am missing?
>>724 I don't really see why you'd need more than that for mathematical related things alone. Why learn R? Does python/MATLAB not give you everything you need? I did do some R but it just seemed like a waste of time
>>731 Maybe it does. I don't really know stats and I have a really hard time staying interested in it whenever I do study it... My reason for learning R is more that it would be a way to stay motivated studying stats lol
(65.00 KB 310x350 ProofGeneral-splash.png)
What do my anons think about proof assistants and interactive theorem provers? Like Coq, Agda, HOL, etc.? Is there any value in this level of formalization of proofs?
>>897 Looks interesting! I have never used one but perhaps I will try one out. I have always just written proofs by hand but just reading about them online they look like they could be useful as software. In terms of the question "is there any value in this level of formalization of proofs" I think the answer is yes. Formalization, while sometimes annoying, generally helps eliminate ambiguity. I don't want to establish conventions about how proofs need to be expressed, because that would be limiting, but specificity in logic and notation is always good. Have you used this software before?
>>898 I did play around with Coq, although I was more interested in proving the correctness of algorithms than with mathematics. But at that time it turned out that I was too un/edu/cated to understand what was going on. I want to give it another go.
>>1046 What's the implementation language? I have really enjoyed my time with both Lisp and Haskell.
>>1053 Coq is written in OCaml, but ACL2 is in Common Lips and Agda is in Haskell. They all implement their own language that you need to write your theorems and proofs in.
(295.03 KB 900x900 0de03e7b0c8fe76a.png)
>>1187 Based and Zerzan-pilled
Fuck you I hate maths. It made me gay and I can't stop sucking dick.
>>1209 I don't see how that's a bad thing. >>1187 Based.
I've always been more of an Arts guy, but I recall only one instance in my life where I enjoyed maths. Once was in high school where one of our substitutes figured out I like medieval stuff. And so, in his infinite patience, he design a few lessons just for me around building a trebuchet. It was awesome and so quickly I began to "get" it. Alas, less than two weeks later our normal maths teacher came back. As he barked at us to open our books, I asked if I could continue with the previous teacher's work as I was nearly done. He then said "Why? What are you? Too stupid?" then chuckled. It was at that point that I fully disengaged from maths. So much so that I was put in to the "Special" maths class, but since we had to take roll-call in our normal class there was extra shame at being the "most autistic in the normal class". But regardless, I did enjoy playing with blocks and doing maths a different way. It was just a shame it was branded as the "retarded" maths group because I learned a lot from our teacher. She was a bit alternative, but she truly saw the beauty of numbers in everything because she said she could "see" them in different colours. I'm not sure if that's true however or just what she told us. Don't know why I felt compelled to tell you this, perhaps because I'd like to try to learn maths again. Alas, I don't know where to start since I stopped learning in grade eight :\
>>366 >I want to write on the topic of math pedagogy. As I teacher, though not maths as mentioned before, I'm going to read this. Looks interesting.
>>1239 Thanks! Like I said it is very rough and not even a fully formed idea. I wrote it in one sitting a couple months ago and haven't gone back to it. I might start working on it again since I am hitting a wall with my current project (critique of cockshott) and I try to rotate between works to stay interested. Let me know what you think!
>>1238 >I've always been more of an Arts guy, but I recall only one instance in my life where I enjoyed maths. In school we are encouraged to categorize ourselves this way. I am an arts guy. I am a math guy. I am a stem guy. It is easy to see why this is encouraged. It serves the interests of capital, by categorizing students by aptitude, and shoehorning them down tracks where they will end up with specialized educations that allow them to form a particular skill set that will allow them to perform a particular function in the capitalist sphere of production. The renaissance man or woman is of little use to capital, and they may even constitute a threat to the status quo because they are more likely to grasp the totality of our situation. >And so, in his infinite patience, he design a few lessons just for me around building a trebuchet. >It was awesome and so quickly I began to "get" it. Sounds like a good teacher. For me the "getting it" moment came in college when I took proofs. I had already chosen math as a major, but I chose it in particular because it was the class I had always struggled the most in, and I had this bizarre idea that this meant I should pursue it. I've always been motivated by challenge and turned off when things come easily, which is kind of a double edged sword because it makes it hard to stick with things once they start to click. As soon as I had contributed to a novel discovery I dropped out. I don't think the paper was ever published. There where financial reasons to, and I was getting more involved in organizing, but that was definitly part of it. I realized that I could be a research mathematician if I wanted (which up until that point had been my goal) and I realized that is not what I wanted to do. I needed to work on a less achievable goal like ending capitalism. This might sound defeatist, and it absolutely is, but it's how I operate. >As he barked at us to open our books, I asked if I could continue with the previous teacher's work as I was nearly done. He then said "Why? What are you? Too stupid?" then chuckled. So many math teachers come across as straight up sadists. I didn't find this to be the case in college, but I hated most of my math teachers through grade school. My high school geometry teacher was really cool though. >So much so that I was put in to the "Special" maths class, but since we had to take roll-call in our normal class there was extra shame at being the "most autistic in the normal class". I also can't stand the way that students are encouraged to think that getting it = being smart = having value. It's not just schools that do this, parents who want their kids to get good grades all the time carry just as much culpability. >She was a bit alternative, but she truly saw the beauty of numbers in everything because she said she could "see" them in different colours. I'm not sure if that's true however or just what she told us. Synesthesia? It's a real thing and it can have some really interesting implications for mathematical ability. I knew a woman with synesthesia who could recite digits of pi for like half an hour straight. Not slowly either. I don't know exactly what colors had to do with it, but she said it was everything.
I'll just semi hijack this thread... Is there anyone here who would like to add me on discord and do math with me? (Don't worry if you "suck" at math too, you can't possibly be worse off than me in this haha) I working my way out of being math anxious af and barely know what 2+2 is, and I feel like it would be pretty cool to have based Comrade to teach me more. We could do an exchange teaching wise: For example I could: Teach you economic history, political theory, anglosaxan ethics, sociology, or summarize literature with critical comments on e.g. Parts of Capital and side literature to Capital. The dialectic of enlightenment, hegemony and "socialist" strategy, classical sociological theory, a contribution to the critique of political economy, texts by Lenin, Trotsky, Marx. I could teach you how to (hate to use the term) "network" or, if you don't want to use that pesky term, act like a fucking sociopath in line with capital-logic. And yeah also, EU time zone is prolly a good thing 4 ya if u don't wake up super early and are free in the mornings in burgerland or south america. If you read this and find it interesting just reply here. I'll be checking this post again tomorrow around the same time, so be online then and then I'll send a privnote with my username :)
>>1272 Sure anon. I normally do that for work anyway but it's kinda dried up since we entered this recession and all. I've actually got a discord server that I set up as a sort of curated library of math related content, but I never got around to finishing it and I've barely given anyone the invite link. cybercom_[email protected](dot)ch
>>1279 ... it would also be chull to take on a pro-bono client since I normally do in person sessions and haven't yet gotten the chance to test out my whole screenshare, wacom tablet setup on my machine running windows (which is the one I use discord one, no way I'm putting that spyware on my main computer lol)
>>1280 Sounds comfy
hello comrades, what's 3+2?
>>1364 Try this: >sudo apt-get install octave >octave >3 + 2
>>1369 if your distro doesn't come with bc by default then that's a little odd, but the nice thing about bc is that you can just do >bc 3+2
>>1374 Huh >bc 3+2 returns <File 3+2 is unavailable I'm on arch.
i'm studying the finite element method
>>1646 I'm more of a finite difference man, have you ever studied that?
I personally find math incredibly boring, don’t care for it.
>>347 Linear Algebra Probability Calculus
>>344 Everybody now some good books on that go rigorously through the math of a planned economy?, (aside from the soviet ones).
Do any of you guys have an interest in a thread where we go through sections of a textbook on linear algebra together and return to the thread at least once a week to discuss what we learned. I don't think this would necessary for me to learn the material, and I intend to learn it anyway, but I do think learning would be more fun this way.
>>3388 Sure
>>3388 I would lurk and help people out, especially if it's linear algebra!
Alright I'll post a thread this sunday using the syllabus from MITs open course
Is there any material for people who never took calculus in highschool? Mine's was shitty. Any online courses or books?
>>3406 Thanks, man.
I'm in my final year of math now (Europe), can't fucking wait to finish this shit, math is a fucking tragedy. I'll probably do a masters in numerical analysis or just go berserk and do topology and geometry.
(3.68 KB 276x64 bessel.PNG)
this is now an applied math thread. abstractists gtfo Post ODEs/PDEs
(160.57 KB 1239x131 Capture.PNG)
>>3406 many many courses on youtube. if you want something more structured and gamified start with KhanAcademy.org The calculus playlist is great.
>>3405 for you ---> >>3890
I’m taking differential equations and my textbook is useless as fuck. is there an accessible alternative that has more example problems?
>>366 Do you happen to know any good courses online or whatever on discrete math? I found it pretty interesting but my professor was NOT GOOD at explaining the material and since COVID happened we kind of rushed through the class so I left feeling like I didn't entirely understand all of it
>>344 >All good communists study math. fuck
>>344 Why is studying math important for communism? I'm not good at math. I had quite a bit of it in school before uni and found it very alienating. If it's so important where would you anons recommend a brainlet like me start?
>>6573 Mood
>>6574 it's not. it's almost completely useless for a revolutionary and i question op's understanding of practical reality, something an unhealthy regard for mathematics tends to work against. this is probably just one bit of liberal indoctrination op has yet to address. you know the whole bit about applied hard sciences being more valuable than any other kind of pursuit of knowledge and technology being an absolute good and inherently progressing mankind as the last fading bit of enlightenment optimism.
>>6615 Math is critical in understanding statistics and science. Both are required to navigate politics and find the truth in all of the noise and propaganda in the superstructure. Also, math is beautiful on it's own, and deeply enriching on it's own. And your statement about it being indoctrination is completely false. Most people are deeply math illiterate, and that's done on purpose to keep proles from using the most powerful language ever devised by humans in history.

Delete
Report

no cookies?